Weather, a central component of world building #amwriting

Good examples for writing weather…

Life in the Realm of Fantasy

Whether you write literary fiction, epic fantasy, historical fiction, or any other genre, you must carefully construct the environment your novel is set in. The weather is a constant in our lives and affects how we dress, how we travel, and what we eat. Therefore, it is a central component of world building. How does the weather come into play in your novel?

If your novel’s setting is a low-tech society, the weather will have more of an effect on your characters than one set in a modern society. However, in any era, the weather will affect the speed with which your characters can travel great distances, and it will affect how they dress. Bad weather always has a detrimental effect on transportation, a serious point to consider.

The weather can be shown in small, subtle ways. We use the weather to show the world in such a way that it…

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Critical Thinking: The 5 Factors that Earn 5 Star Reviews!

For all the writers …

Karen Dowdall

An excerpt from: Paul Goat Allen | March 12, 2018, Writer’s Digest. Paul Goat Allen has worked as a genre fiction book critic and written thousands of reviews for companies like BarnesandNoble.com, Publishers Weekly, the Chicago Tribune and Kirkus Reviews.

Novelists live and die by reviews yet uncovering what garners a gushing ovation or blistering takedown is often a mystery. A professional critic lays out what it takes to earn five-star book reviews. For two decades I’d been working as a freelance genre fiction book critic for outlets such as BarnesandNoble.com, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus Reviews and the Chicago Tribune. After sharing my credentials with the group, some of the writers began telling stories about mediocre or bad reviews they’d received at different points in their careers from one or more of the companies I’d listed.

As a reviewer, not much has changed since then. I enjoy all genres and have…

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Not On the Cards, by Cage Dunn

So, this is one of my critique partners 🙂

Meeka's Mind

Cage Dunn is an Australian writer who answered my recent call for beta readers. Cage not only tested my latest how-to book, she introduced it to two groups of potential writers at her local library. Their combined feedback was so much more than I could ever have hoped for.

Curious, I decided to read one of Cage’s books. That book was ‘Not on the Cards’, and this is the review I just left for it on Amazon:

At its heart, Not on the Cards is a story of love and responsibility: Gate Keeper to Key Master, mother to child, Gate Keeper to multiverse, yet for much of the time, its set in a carpark near Camberwell Junction. On the weekends, that humble carpark becomes a Trash & Treasure market with a deliciously bohemian atmosphere. I know, because the market is in my home town of Melbourne [Australia], and I’ve been…

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A whine

Okay, so I’m reading this book, a highly recommended book. It’s so good, someone went onto Youtube and raved about it. That’s how I learned of it.

It’s traditionally published. It has a distinctive voice. The characters are sorta interesting, but I feel like I’m reading backstory, embellished in a pretty way. How does this happen in our day and age? Readers are sophisticated and educated. They know story structure. Even my daughter learns it in High School. I don’t understand.

I’m 10% into the book and I’m still waiting for the story to start. Writers beware. If you want your story read, tell a story, not backstory. And make a reader care. So far, I can take or leave the main character. As a writer, I know writing a character is hard and it takes years of practice to get right. I’m still working on it.

Right now, I’m dangerously close to putting the book down. Forever. All that writer’s effort on pretty backstory – wasted. All that writer’s effort on the whole book – undiscovered. That’s if I put the book down, which is looking more probable than not.

Only because I’m expecting the book to improve do I persevere, but all that pretty backstory, I’m going to skim read, I’m not going to read-read anymore. I don’t have time for backstory. No one does. It’s so annoying to buy a book, and a traditionally published book at that, only get backstory. Perhaps my standards are high? I expect a lot from a book. I expect a story. But, don’t you too?

Whine over 🙂

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Cage Dunn: Writer, Author, Teller-of-tall-tales

Don’t forget the Smashwords Summer-Winter sale!

There’s one free book of short stories, and four books reduced by half, but only for July, so if you’re late, you’re too late.

My favourite is Agoness (oh, and Picquet, and Not on the Cards, and even though I will probably never do another Allegory, I quite like the Kraken story, too), but you choose … and have fun!

Truthfully, I write the stories because I love them, but I have a few more that need to be made ready, so stay tuned to see what happens!

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Don’t let the moon catch you napping, or you’ll miss out.

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It’s A-Live!!!

Cage Dunn: Writer, Author, Teller-of-tall-tales

The moment has come. Picquet is published. The e-book is out there.

And Smashwords has it half-price for the July Summer-Winter Sale.swlogo

A new world, a dangerous place mistakenly assessed as suitable for human colonisation.
An inexperienced corporal must lead a motley group of civilians to the only possible point of extraction. Mistake, or exile?

Corporal Kopa Redding becomes a senior member of the rapidly diminishing group of colonists to a new planet. A horde of monsters pursues them and kills off more every night. If not for the lights …
And then it happens, there are no lights, and Corporal Kopa Redding is on night picquet. Alone. They come …

An exciting, fast-paced run through an alien world where nothing is familiar.

Want an excerpt? Here it is:

Everywhere he looked was unsuitable. He’d be as visible as a single star in a galaxy.

“I’m afraid,” he said to the…

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